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Mandala Series

Click on the paintings below to see a larger view

According to art therapist and mental health counselor Susanne F. Fincher, we owe the re-introduction of mandalas into modern Western thought to Carl Jung, the Swiss psychoanalyst. In his pioneering exploration of the unconscious through his own art making, Jung observed the motif of the circle spontaneously appearing.

—Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, pp. 195 – 196.
Jung recognized that the urge to make mandalas emerges during moments of intense personal growth. Their appearance indicates a profound re-balancing process is underway in the psyche. The result of the process is a more complex and better integrated personality.
"The mandala serves a conservative purpose—namely, to restore a previously existing order. But it also serves the creative purpose of giving expression and form to something that does not yet exist, something new and unique…. The process is that of the ascending spiral, which grows upward while simultaneously returning again and again to the same point."

—Jungian analyst Marie-Louise von Franz, C. G. Jung: "Man and His Symbols," p. 225
Creating mandalas helps stabilize, integrate, and re-order inner life.[26]
According to the psychologist David Fontana, its symbolic nature can help one "to access progressively deeper levels of the unconscious, ultimately assisting the meditator to experience a mystical sense of oneness with the ultimate unity from which the cosmos in all its manifold forms arises."[27]


Antelope

Elephants

Lions

Giraffes

Flamingos

Zebras

Anise
Garlic
Garlic

Turmeric
 
Cardamom

Cloves

Peppers
 

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